Quebec’s elderly care is sickening

A daughter  went to court  to seek an emergency injunction to force the curator to treat her father, who is being left “to die,” she maintained, because the curator will not authorize the necessary antibiotics to treat his lungs, or to treat a urinary infection he has also contracted. This is euthanasia. Pneumonia is easily cured with a round of antibiotics.  The Quebec Public Curator stepped in this summer to take over all legal , financial payments and decisions for 80-year-old father. This is how they make money using redundant now hospital beds.The Government has cut 500 beds in long-term facilities in the last 10 years, and now are offering medical aid rather to die for the very sick.

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Om Quebec there is not enough existing staff to look after the seniors in the old age homes.. Doctors and Nurses included.. Seniors tend to be more ill, sicker, need more nursing care, more distribution of  pills, more looking after, more bed linen changing too,  and a ratio of one nurse to 40 senior patients is totally inadequate.. never mind if they have seriously ill patients.. and forget any care during the night even..So what is the government best proposed solution on this matter.. Euthanasia, kill them.. especially if no family members object and no family members visit them for two weeks.. you just stop feeding them and stop giving them any water and they will be dead within 5 days..  https://thenonconformer.wordpress.com/2011/11/03/a-long-term-care-home-employee-faces-a-criminal-negligence-charge/

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quebec-medicare

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A nurse at Info-Santé recommended   the daughter for an ambulance to take him to an acute-care hospital for emergency treatment. But after the ambulance arrived,   staff at the nursing home stopped her father from leaving. And  the floor coordinator called the police,   because the guardian public curator had not issued a directive to allow him to leave.

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The daughter was next successful in obtaining a court decision ordering the public curator to release her father to be transported to the Montreal General Hospital for treatment. .

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Home and medical care for ailing seniors has been criticized by everyone from Quebec’s auditor-general to the provincial ombudsman for the past 15 years all to no avail.. Will  they let you doe too next?..

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Quebec has worst emergency room wait times, in the country and among the worst in the Western world, 35 per cent of patients in Quebec — one in three — waited  hours or more for help in an emergency ward, one patient in 10 who goes to an emergency room leaves having failed to have seen a doctor or being directed to another establishment. The average provincial wait time for a specialist in a hospital is about eight hours.  The wait times in Quebec hospitals have barely changed in the past five years. The average wait time in an emergency room in Quebec is 15.3 hours in 2016. In 2015, the average wait was nearly the same: 15.4 hours. In 2015, about 45 per cent of all ER visits, 1.5 million, were longer than the maximum time recommended by Quebec’s health department  Almost half of cancer patients in Montreal wait more than 4 weeks for surgery. 232 Montreal cancer patients had been waiting at least two months for their surgery .  The government’s publicly stated objective is that 90 per cent of cancer patients scheduled for surgery undergo their operation within 28 days. Yet in Montreal, no hospital has achieved that goal. Ontario has a better system of prioritizing cancer surgical cases based on four levels of urgency. Cancers of the breast, lung and colon should be given immediate priority, while thyroid and even prostate cancers can wait beyond 28 days,
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A report card system, which allows nurses and doctors to see how their efforts stand up compared to others, have improved results.  Quebec doctors, however, have traditionally resisted any form of performance evaluation. Ontario spends $30 million a year on performance evaluations — conducted by a similar agency — and its results are among the best in Canada.
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A Quebec hospital  investigating the death of a diabetic man who died while sitting in a wheelchair in the waiting room at a Montreal emergency department.  André Desjardins, 64, went to the Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital by ambulance after complaining of severe pain. He already suffered from high blood pressure and was a heavy smoker, in addition to having diabetes. A doctor at the hospital saw him but Desjardins was sent back to the waiting area. As his pain worsened, family members pleaded with staff to let him lie down on a stretcher, but none was provided. Instead, hospital staff put him in a wheelchair, where he spent an estimated seven hours waiting for futher care before he died, said his relatives. Making anyone in a medical crisis wait for care in an ER makes no sense at all, and reflects Quebec’s chronic problem with emergency care, said patients’ rights advocate Paul Brunet. “We had the ultimate failure of the system with the death of this guy. We shouldn’t have to wait in an emergency ward. We should stop accepting that,” said Brunet, who heads Quebec’s Conseil de protection des malades. “Evidently that patient was gravely ill, and certainly should have been taken care of more seriously than he was.” The hospital has apologized to Desjardins’ family but won’t comment further until its internal investigation is complete. Quebec Health Minister Yves Bolduc said that Desjardins’ death is unacceptable and regrettable, but denied that it had anything to do with the hospital operating at over-capacity. It’s not the first time a patient has died waiting in the Maisonneuve-Rosemont ER. Last February, an elderly woman suffering from Alzheimer’s disease died after waiting two hours on a stretcher in the Maisonneuve-Rosemont ER. Later reports found the hospital’s emergency ward was operating at 200 per cent capacity that day. http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/cbc/101019/canada/canada_montreal_quebec_man_dies_in_hospital_emergency_room
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